Paris National Library

Paris, France.

On 14 July 1988, President François Mitterrand announced the construction and the expansion of one of the largest and most modern libraries in the world, intended to cover all fields of knowledge, and designed to be accessible to all, using the most modern data transfer technologies, which could be consulted from a distance, and which would collaborate with other European libraries. Book and media logistics inside the whole library was planned with an automated 6.6 km Telelift system. Only with this high level of automation, the library can comply with all demands fully in time. Due to initial trade unions opposition, a wireless network was fully installed only in August 2016.

In July 1989, the services of the architectural firm of Dominique Perrault (www.perraultarchitecture.com/en/homepage) were retained. The design was recognized with the European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture in 1996. The construction was carried out by Bouygues. Construction of the library ran into huge cost overruns and technical difficulties related to its high-rise design, so much so that it was referred to as the “TGB” or “Très Grande Bibliothèque” (i.e. “Very Large Library,” a sarcastic allusion to France’s successful high-speed rail system, the TGV). After the move of the major collections from the rue de Richelieu, the National Library of France was inaugurated on 15 December 1996. As of 2016, the BnF contains roughly 14 million books on its 4 parisian sites (Tolbiac, Richelieu, Arsenal, Opéra) as well as printed documents, manuscripts, prints, photographs, maps and plans, scores, coins, medals, sound documents, video and multimedia documents, scenery elements…” The library retains the use of the rue de Richelieu complex for some of its collections.

Source en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biblioth%C3%A8que_nationale_de_France

Motor Yacht Haida G


I spotted this yacht in Villefranche sur Mer June 18, 2008. This is the only photo I took. Originally as Haida it was built for the millionaire yeast producer Max C. Fleischmann (1877-1952) following plans drafted by the New York naval architects Cox and Stevens. After completion it was berthed at the Santa Barbara Yacht Club, California.

Formerly known as Rosenkavalier, the incredible Haida G was built in 1929 by German shipyard Krupp Germania Werft and re-fit in 2007 by Amico & Co.
At 71.1 metres, Haida G offers seven luxurious cabins decorated in a unique and elegant style. Her white and bright cottage-like design theme exists continuously throughout the motor yacht and offers a welcome respite from other superyachts reliance on muted neutrals and glossy wood.

via Superyachts

Currently the yacht is named Dona Amelia.

According to Pendennis It got a 4 months refit in 2012 mainly an overhaul of all engines and some engineering. Amazingly it still is propelled by the two Krupp (currently MAN) diesel engines installed in 1929.

Its interior:

And its motors:

The yacht came up for publication here, as I spotted the first photo in my archive only recently while at the same time I remembered the two following photo’s of a similar yacht albeit a lot smaller that was abandoned and very dilapidated when I spotted it along one of Holland’s canals, also in 2008, but in October:
P1020102
P1020103

Pop-Up House – Affordable Passive House

The French Firm Popup House has developed a method of building an affordable passive House

The video is quite explanatory:

Pop-Up House: the affordable passive house from Popup House on Vimeo.

Pop Up House – Paris Mai 2016 – Journée de solidarité logement from Popup House on Vimeo.

Via Het Kan Wel and Dutch Design Studio
And see: Multipod Studio

Gehry in Paris

We Don’t Need No Photoshop

Recently I’ve mastered some simple tricks in Photoshop. Hoever I’ve visited the Louis Vuiton Museum in the Bois du Boulogne on a day and moment the wheather was purrrfect for photographers. Took many shots and didn’t need any (or hardly any) editing. Hence the Pink Floyd reference…..

Two nice photo’s unshopped of the building designed by Frank Gehry ….

Louis Vuiton Foundation by Frank Gehry

Louis Vuiton Foundation Paris by Frank Gehry

De Stijl Centennial – Dutch Design 68

De Stijl Centennial colors The Hague all white city hall

The Hague celebrates the 100st Anniversary of De Stijl. Therefore the city counsel decided to color the all white Richard Meier designed city hall and central library in the Stijl manner with 3 primary colors Red Blue and yellow which De Stijl members like Piet Mondrian and Gerrit Rietveld used to combine with Black and White…..

Update: Am proud to be featured on A Daily Dose of Archidose

Update: and a comparable photo of Meier’s site in white only:

From Richard Meier’s site, Photography by Richard Bryant/ARCAID