Eye Amsterdam

Eye Amsterdam

Eye in Amsterdam is the seat of the Dutch Film Institute. Vienna,. Austria based Delugan Meissl Associated Architects designed the Eye Film Institute of Amsterdam.

Their Home Page: www.dmaa.at/home.html

Their Project Page: www.dmaa.at/projekte/detail-page/eye-film-institute.html

Rotterdam: Hotel New York

Hotel New York in Rotterdam embedded between high rises. It used to be the passengers terminal for the Holland – Amerika Line.

This is Post # 1,000 of this blog.

Apt subject. as the making of this hotel in Rotterdam inspired me to create my small hotel / B & B Haagsche Suites in The Hague later.

The highest highrise here is the Montevideo building by Francine Houben.

Left Highrise is WorldPortCenter by Norman Foster.

Radisson Blu Royal Hotel, København

When in Copenhagen, you have at least to drive, bike or walk past Radisson Blu Royal Hotel, København, a piece of Gesamt Architecture designed between 1956 and 1960 by one of Danish starchitects, Arne Jacobsen. Arne also designed a lot of the Interior. Think Egg chair and Swan Chair. Unfortunately there is only one hotel room (Room 606) left in the original style. However you can opt to sleep in it if you want and if you can afford it. It is expensive!

Built as the SAS Royal Hotel, the hotel was renamed the Radisson SAS Royal Hotel in 1994, when SAS bought a share in the foreign division of Radisson hotels. When SAS sold their share in 2009, it was renamed as Radisson Blu Royal Hotel, København

Obelisk de Caja by Calatrava in Madrid

The Needle by Calatrava, or as he says: “The Obelisk” is located at Plaza de Castilla, in the north of Madrid, next to the “Puerta de Europa” towers and the new CT Business Area. It is a present by the Caja bank to the city of Madrid at the occasion of its 300th anniversary.

A large movable sculpture formed by a central tube of steel covered by a skin of 462 bronze bars that can be moved by means of a hydraulic system. The central tube rests on an auxiliary steel structure that spans over the different tunnels and galleries located beneath the square. The foundation elements are three concrete piles with a diameter of 1m.

On both side of the obelisk you can see the twin leaning towers of Puerta de Europa (114 m, designed by Philip Johnson), behind it the Torre Caja Madrid (250 m, designed by Lord Norman Foster) and partly two other skyscrapers (Torre Sacyr Vallehermoso and Torre Espacio, both 236 m)

Paris National Library

Paris, France.

On 14 July 1988, President François Mitterrand announced the construction and the expansion of one of the largest and most modern libraries in the world, intended to cover all fields of knowledge, and designed to be accessible to all, using the most modern data transfer technologies, which could be consulted from a distance, and which would collaborate with other European libraries. Book and media logistics inside the whole library was planned with an automated 6.6 km Telelift system. Only with this high level of automation, the library can comply with all demands fully in time. Due to initial trade unions opposition, a wireless network was fully installed only in August 2016.

In July 1989, the services of the architectural firm of Dominique Perrault (www.perraultarchitecture.com/en/homepage) were retained. The design was recognized with the European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture in 1996. The construction was carried out by Bouygues. Construction of the library ran into huge cost overruns and technical difficulties related to its high-rise design, so much so that it was referred to as the “TGB” or “Très Grande Bibliothèque” (i.e. “Very Large Library,” a sarcastic allusion to France’s successful high-speed rail system, the TGV). After the move of the major collections from the rue de Richelieu, the National Library of France was inaugurated on 15 December 1996. As of 2016, the BnF contains roughly 14 million books on its 4 parisian sites (Tolbiac, Richelieu, Arsenal, Opéra) as well as printed documents, manuscripts, prints, photographs, maps and plans, scores, coins, medals, sound documents, video and multimedia documents, scenery elements…” The library retains the use of the rue de Richelieu complex for some of its collections.

Source en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biblioth%C3%A8que_nationale_de_France